Decorated and Decorative Paper Collection

Decorated and Decorative Paper Collection
Data Dictionary
Last update: March, 2006

Field name

DC mapping

Authority File

Comments

Title

Title: Searchable, public; required

The title is a brief descriptive phrase in a concise sentence containing the following elements, in this order: 1) Vintage or Modern, 2) Century, 3) Type, 4) Pattern (if applicable/ known).  The title will be used to label the thumbnails; it will also be the first line of the descriptive information.

Examples:

Vintage 19th c. marbled paper, Shell pattern

Vintage 18th c. paste paper

Modern 21st c. marbled paper, Serpentine pattern

 

Artist

Creator: Searchable, public

LCAF

The artist is the name of the artist or person associated with the creation of the image in hand. This information should represent as closely as possible the creator’s name or the company’s name at the time of the creation of the object. Can be the same entry as in the Studio Name field. Includes both personal and corporate names. Input Lastname, Firstname for all personal names. Use LC Authority File for form of name, if available.

Use “Unknown” if artist is unknown.

Studio Name

Publisher : non-searchable, public/staff field

LCAF

If the studio name/publisher of the work on hand is known, it is provided in the Studio Name field. Input Lastname, Firstname for all personal names. Use LC Authority File for form of name, if available.

Place of Production

Publisher: non-searchable, public/staff field

LCAF

If the city of publication or production in which the artist/creator worked at the time the object was created is known to the cataloger, it is provided in the Place of Production field.  The place name is derived from the LC Authority File form .Enter Country--State or Province--City.

Examples:

United States—Washington (State)—Seattle

France—Paris

Date

Date: Searchable, public

 

A non-searchable text field. The date the original artifact was published/created. The date should be a specific year. If the date is unknown, and it is impossible to assign an approximate date using the form "ca." (circa), use “n.d.”

This field is used in combination with the Dates field to enable searching (see that entry for details).

Examples:

1967
ca. 1904

 

Dates

Date: Searchable, staff only hidden field; required

 

Reflects the Date field. Use format of single year(s). If the date is a single year, it is the same in both the Date and the Dates fields. If the date in the Date field is a "circa" date (e.g., ca. 1895) or a date range (e.g., 1908-1945), the Dates field contains the expanded version listing each year so that searching will find dates covered by the date range. Five years on either side is the preferred form for circa dates.

Examples
Date: ca. 1910
Dates: 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915

 

Earliest Date

None: Non-searchable, staff only hidden field; required

 

Reflects the Date field. Use ISO 8601 format (YYYY, or YYYY-MM, or YYYY-MM-DD as needed). If the date is a single year, it is the same in both the Date and the Earliest Date fields. If the date in the Date field is a "circa" date (e.g., ca. 1895) or a date range (e.g., 1965-1973), the Earliest Date field contains the first date in the date range.

Examples
Date: 1940
Earliest Date: 1940

Date: ca. 1910
Earliest Date: 1905

 

Latest Date

None: Non-searchable, staff only hidden field; required

 

Reflects the Date field. Use ISO 8601 format (YYYY, or YYYY-MM, or YYYY-MM-DD as needed). If the date is a single year, it is the same in both the Date and the Latest Date fields. If the date in the Date field is a "circa" date or date range, the Latest Date field contains the last date in the date range.

Examples
Date: 1940
Latest Date: 1940

Date: ca. 1910
Latest Date: 1915

 

Description Notes

Description: Searchable, public

 

Description Notes can include any information of importance (regarding the item’s physical description and related background) that is not represented elsewhere. Each separate "note" under this heading should be its own paragraph, separated from one from another by a blank line.(<br><br>)

  • Source type (flat sample, book cover, etc.)
  • Note about source item (e.g. book title)
  • Medium/technique notes (oil marbling, burnishing – y/n, treatment, base color of paper etc.)
  • Pattern names and background details
  • Relationships between patterns
  • 3 primary colors in pattern

 

Collection Notes

 

Description: non-searchable, public/staff field

 

 

Collection Notes can be used to provide additional background information about the collection from which the item was drawn. Each separate "note" under this heading should be its own paragraph, separated from one from another by a blank line.(<br><br>)

  • Background note(s) about Collection (e.g. new Guyot collection, or Mendery samples)
  • Explanatory note about dates on historic items

Paper Process/Medium

Format: searchable, public/staff field

 

Paper Process/Medium describes the process/medium used to create the work. Terms in this field are taken from Sidney Berger’s vocabulary (See article by Berger, S. (2005). Cataloging decorated papers. Hand Papermaking, 20(2), 30-32.) and/or from Don Guyot, local papermaker. A hierarchy of terms will be composed of one of Berger’s 5 process types and then medium type and will be separated by dashes:

One of Berger’s 5 process types -- Medium type

  • Colored papers
  • Fiber distributed papers
  • Impregnated papers
  • Surface application papers
  • Surface treated papers

Examples:

Surface application papers—Marbled papers

Surface application papers—Printed papers

 

Prominent Pattern Type

Description; searchable, public/staff field

 

Primary Pattern Type describes the primary pattern (easily or commonly recognized) of the decorated paper work. Terms currently drawn from Wolfe & Miura, but sources may eventually be expanded.

Terms taken from:

  • Wolfe, R. (1990). Marbled paper: Its history, techniques, and patterns. With special reference to the relationship of marbling to bookbinding in Europe and the Western world. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

 

  • Miura, E. (1989). The art of marbled paper: marbled patterns and how to make them. London: Zaehnsdorf Ltd.

Examples:

Dutch Curl

Alternate pattern name(s) (Dutch): Comb, Combed

Alternate pattern name(s) (Curl): Curled

Secondary Pattern Type

Description; searchable, public/staff field

 

Secondary Pattern Type describes the secondary pattern (more obscure; lesser known or recognized) of the decorated paper work. Currently relies primarily on Wolfe & Miura, but may eventually be expanded.

Terms taken from:

  • Wolfe, R. (1990). Marbled paper: Its history, techniques, and patterns. With special reference to the relationship of marbling to bookbinding in Europe and the Western world. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

 

  • Miura, E. (1989). The art of marbled paper: marbled patterns and how to make them. London: Zaehnsdorf Ltd.

Examples:

Dutch Curl

Alternate pattern name(s) (Dutch): Comb, Combed

Alternate pattern name(s) (Curl): Curled

Subjects (TGM)

 

Subject: Searchable, public

LC TGM I

 

Include here only subjects from LC's Thesaurus for Graphic Materials. Separate each subject by <br>.

 

Subject (LCSH)

Subject: Searchable, public

LCSH

LCSH will be used only when TGM has no appropriate term for a particular object or concept. Terms in this field are taken from the LC Subject Headings list (LCSH). Form and genre terms taken from LCSH are also included in this field. Put all names of people and corporate names used as subjects in this field too. Separate each subject by <br>.

Examples:
Markets—Washington (State)—Seattle
McGraw, John Harte, -1911—Statues—Washington (State)—Seattle

 

References

Relation-References: searchable, public/staff field

 

 

The References field identifies any resource which references, cites, or points to the work. Terms in this field are taken from Wolfe or Miura. (Potentially to be later converted into references to a controlled vocabulary & searchable image bank.)

Examples:

Wolfe Plates XXVI 37 and Plate XXXVII 173 (Dutch Curl)

Miura 46 (Feather)

 

Original Source

Relation-Is Part Of Source : Searchable, public

 

In cases where the decorated/decorative paper work is part of a book, the Original Source field contains the title and author for that book.

Digital Collection

Relation-Is Part Of: Non-searchable, public

Name of the digital collection, may or may not be the same name as the original repository collection.

Decorated and Decorative Paper Collection

 

Order Number

None: Searchable, public

Unique accession number for the digital object for identification purposes (for UW materials only).

 

Ordering Information

None: Non-Searchable, public; required

Instructions for ordering (if applicable) and contact information.

To order a reproduction, inquire about permissions, or for information about prices, please email photos@u.washington.edu

 

Negative Number

Identifier: searchable, public/staff field

The Duplication/Reproduction Number refers to the reproduction number assigned to the image for purposes of duplication. It is the unique number by which Special Collections identifies the image. It may be identical to another number in the record. If two negatives numbers are associated with an image, these are to be separated by a semicolon.

Repository

Source: Non-searchable, public

Contains institution where the item is physically located.

University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections Division

Repository Collection

Source: Searchable, public

The Repository Collection contains the primary collection name, a subset collection name (if applicable), and call number if the book or group of ephemera is cataloged.

In this case, the collection name, and the Source Item number (Unique Identifier, or Call Number):

Examples:

Book Arts Collection, Decorated and Decorative Papers

Book Arts Collection, Don Guyot Collection

Hilen 19th Century Americana Collection, Historic Bookbinding

Collection

 

Object Type

Type ;
searchable ;
public

AAT

Classification of the object by broad physical form or method of production. Use controlled vocabulary from the Art & Architecture Thesaurus. They will also match Sidney Berger’s controlled vocabulary (in press), and represent umbrella categories for the terms utilized in the Paper Process/Medium field.

Examples:

Decorated papers

Decorative papers

Physical Description

Format: Non-searchable, public

The physical dimensions of the original item.

Follow Graphic Materials: Rules for Describing Original Items and Historical Collections.

Reference Number

Identifier: searchable, staff only field

The Reference Number is a unique identifier for the image, to be used internally for locating the object with Special Collections.

The Unique ID contains the following information:

  • Collection or Source (Don Guyot, mendery, etc.)
  • Era (vintage, modern, etc.)
  • Medium (marbled paper, paste paper, etc.)

Examples:

M41-vintage-mp

Sc-modern-guyot-mp1

 

Digital Reproduction

Information

 

 

 

 

Format: non-searchable, staff-only field

 

 

 

 

 

Describes the digital conversion process, date scanned, etc.

 

Example:

Scanned from an original sample using a Microtek Scanmaker 9600XL at between 550-600 dpi, saved in TIFF, resized, and imported as JPEG 2000. 2006

 

 

 

Contributor

Contributor: non-searchable, staff only field

 

 

A person or organization not specified in the Creator field who has made a significant contribution to the resource, but whose contribution is secondary to any person or organization specified in the Creator field.

Example
University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections Division

 

Acquisition

None: non-searchable, staff-only field

 

 

This field lists the source and date of acquisition of the object.

Example
Purchased from Fairlook Antiques, Seattle, 1989
Gift of Aubrey Watzek, 1953; acc. no. 53-1634

 

Restrictions

Rights: non-searchable, staff-only field

 

 

This field lists any restrictions on the use of a text or image.

 

Type

Type: Searchable, public; required

DCMI Type Vocabulary

Used for cross database search limits.

Example:

StillImage