Award Winners

2020-2021 Winners

Winners of the 2020-2021 Library Research Award for Undergraduates

Grand Prize: Upper Division Thesis


Grand Prize: Upper Division Non-Thesis Division


Grand Prize: Lower Division


Honorable Mention: Upper division, Thesis


Honorable Mention: Upper division Non-Thesis


Honorable Mention: Lower Division


 

Population Health Award

 

2019 Winners

Winners of the 2019 Library Research Award for Undergraduates

Upper Division Thesis


Upper Division Non-Thesis Division


Lower Division


Honorable Mention: Upper division, Thesis


Honorable Mention: Upper division Non-Thesis


Honorable Mention: Lower Division


 

Population Health Award

 

2018 Winners

Winners of the 2018 Library Research Award for Undergraduates

Senior Thesis Division


Senior Non-Thesis Division


Non-senior Division


Honorable Mention: Senior Thesis Division


Honorable Mention: Senior Non-Thesis Division


Honorable Mention: Non-senior Division


2017 Winners

Senior Thesis Division


Senior Non-Thesis Division


Non-senior Division


Honorable Mention: Senior Thesis Division


Honorable Mention: Senior Non-Thesis Division


Honorable Mention: Non-senior Division


2016 Winners

Senior Thesis Division

Senior Non-Thesis Division

Non-senior Division

Honorable Mentions

Shannon Abbott (Nursing)
Faculty Advisor: Ira Kantrowitz-Gordon
Senior Non-Thesis Project: Mindfulness Classes Transform the Experiences of Postpartum Women

Ian Bellows (International Studies)
Faculty Advisor: David Citrin
Non-senior Project: The End of Everest? Reimagining Himalayan Adventure Travel in an Age of Unnatural Disasters

Tomás Narvaja (Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies)
Faculty Advisor: Nancy Kenney
Senior Non-Thesis Project: The Failures of Consent: How the (En)gendering of Sexual Scripts and Desire within Consensual Sex Preserves Rape Culture within the University

2015 Winners

Senior Thesis Division

Senior Non-Thesis Division

Non-senior Division

Honorable Mentions

Benjamin C. Lee (International Studies & Chinese)
Faculty Advisor: David Bachman, International Studies
Senior Thesis: Taiwan and South Korea's Diplomacy in the Age of Transition

Erika VanHorne (History & Economics)
Faculty Advisor: George Behlmer, History
Senior Thesis: Widowhood in the Plymouth Colony: An Inquiry into Family Dynamics through Probate Material

Deborah Indigo Trigg-Hauger (History & Scandinavian Studies)
Faculty Advisor: Terje Leiren, Scandinavian Studies
Senior Non-Thesis Project: Changing Existences in Norway, 1850-1914

Ariel Vardy (Comparative History of Ideas)
Faculty Advisor: Susan Nolen, Education
Non-Senior Project: Behavior Management and Motivation: a Case Study of the Responsive Classroom Approach

2014 Winners

Senior Thesis Division

Senior Non-Thesis Division

Non-senior Division

Honorable Mentions

Morgan Galloway (Political Science)
Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Thorpe, Political Science
Senior Thesis: Blackhawks and Human Rights: The Impact and Consequences of Short-Term Incentives in Militarizing “Plan Colombia”

Azeb Madebo (Communication & Anthropology)
Faculty Advisor: Ralina Joseph, Communication
Senior Thesis: Re-Imagining Identities: Racial and Ethnic Discourses within Seattle’s Habesha Community

Hope St. John (Urban Studies & Global Studies)
Faculty Advisor: Lisa Hoffman, Urban Studies, UW Tacoma
Senior Non-Thesis Project: Ai Weiwei and Maoist Legacies in the Reform Era

Samantha (Jing) Xue (Accounting & Information Systems)
Faculty Advisor: Atanu Lahiri, Foster School of Business
Senior Non-Thesis Project: Drama in the TV Industry: A Study of New Entrants, New Services and New Consolidations

Chris Lower (Sustainable Urban Development, UW Tacoma)
Faculty Advisor: Yonn Dierwechter, Urban Studies, UW Tacoma
Non-Senior Project: Rise of Cities as Catalysts for Effective Climate Action in a Post-Westphalian Landscape

Erika VanHorne (History & Economics)
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnson, History
Non-Senior Project: An Examination of Widow’s Status within the Orphan Chamber of New Amsterdam

2013 Winners

Senior Thesis Division

Senior Non-Thesis Division

Non-senior Division

Honorable Mentions

Molly Ostheller (Latin and Greek)
Faculty Advisor: Olga Levaniouk, Classics
Senior Thesis: Homeric Truth

Gennie Gebhart (International Studies and Economics)
Faculty Advisor: Deborah Porter, Jackson School of International Studies
Senior Thesis: Cultural Vocabularies of Eating and Mourning in Southern Italy: Reflections in Film of Contemporary Eating Disorders and Historical Traumas

Alexander Catchings (English)
Faculty Advisor: Sonnet Retman, American Ethnic Studies
Senior Non-Thesis Project: Look Who's Laughing: Black Buddies, Bodies, and Unlaughter in the Neo-Slave Narrative

Hope St. John (Urban Studies)
Faculty Advisor: Lisa Hoffman, Urban Studies, UW Tacoma
Non-Senior Project: Kamagasaki: The Legacy of Poverty and Uprising in Urban Spaces

Jing (Samantha) Xue (Business)
Faculty Advisor: Asher Curtis, Foster School of Business
Non-Senior Project: The 2008 Financial Crisis and the Resulting Regulatory Changes

2012 Winners

Senior Thesis Division

Senior Non-Thesis Division

Non-senior Division

Honorable Mentions

Vincenzina Robertson (History)
Faculty Advisor: Mary Hanneman, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, UW Tacoma
Senior Thesis: Soaring Eagles of the High Qing: Women's Writing as a Path to Social Advancement in Patriarchal China

Christine Woodward (Geography & Latin American Studies)
Faculty Advisor: Jose Antonio Lucero, Jackson School of International Studies
Senior Thesis: Viva a Revolução/Sent from my iPhone: Politics, culture, and the Fora PM movement

Hannah Giese (History)
Faculty Advisor: Charity Urbanski, History
Non-Senior Project: Death and the Dancing Fairy: Silkie and Vila Folktales as Violations of the Christian Patriarchy

Kyra Lindstrom (Community Psychology)
Faculty Advisor: Kristine Kellejian, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, UW Bothell
Non-Senior Project: The Lifetime of Shyness: Case Studies on Shyness


2011 Winners

Senior Thesis Division, Friends of the Libraries Awards

Senior Non-Thesis Division, Kenneth S. Allen Awards

Non-senior Division: UW Alumni Association Awards

Honorable Mention: Kenneth S. Allen Awards

Brandon Paul Weaver (Comparative Literature & English)
Faculty Advisor: James Gregory, History
Senior Thesis: Politics of Borders / Borders of Politics; The Films of Tony Gatlif

Ashley Parcells (International Studies & History)
Faculty Advisor: Deborah Porter, International Studies
Senior Thesis: English and Education in South Africa: Cultural Consumption and Identity in a Post-Apartheid World

Danielle Newcomer (Psychology)
Faculty Advisor: Nancy Kenney, Psychology
Senior Non-thesis Project: Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in the United States: A Critical Review

2010 Winners

Senior Thesis Division, Friends of the Libraries Awards

Senior Non-Thesis Division, Friends of the Libraries Awards

 

Senior Non-Thesis Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

Roderick Yang (Biology, History)
Faculty Advisor: Jack W. Berryman, Bioethics & Humanities
The Invention of Nutrition

The idea of "nutrition" as we understand it is relatively recent. Prior to the 19th century, food was more or less just food, with the major concern of nutriment being quantity. But with developments in the fields of organic and biological chemistry, scientists in the 19th century began to recognize that food contained a variety of chemical substances, and soon the deluge began. This paper follows the emergence of nutrition as a science, anchored by the major scientific discoveries in the early days of the field, and the concurrent birth of dietary recommendations. Such recommendations, particularly those issued regularly by the USDA since the 1894, reveal the growing complexity in the last 100 years of our understanding of what constitutes food, and what it means to eat healthfully.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Non-senior Division: Kenneth S. Allen Awards

Honorable Mention: Kenneth S. Allen Awards

Alison Bilow (History, Anthropology)
Advisor: Lynn Thomas, History
Senior Thesis: The Bantu World and the Star: Domestic Servants and Racial Respectability in the 1930’s South African Press

Monika Fischer (Biology)
Advisor: Joe Ammirati, Biology
Non-senior project: Orchid Nutrition and Development with Mycorrhizae

Andrew Schwartz (International Studies)
Advisors: Maria Elena Garcia, International Studies and Deborah Porter, Comparative History of Ideas
Senior Thesis: Memories Inked, A History Remembered: Salvadoran Immigrant Gang Tattoos in Los Angeles

Gordon Waite (Comparative Literature, Comparative History of Ideas)
Advisor: Jennifer Bean, Comparative Literature
Senior Non-thesis project: Evolution of Dialogue in Early Sound Film

2009 Winners

Senior Thesis Division, Friends of the Libraries Award

 

Senior Non-Thesis Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

Valerie Hoagland (French and Italian Studies)
Dr. Susan Gaylard
La Vergine Completa: Visione Particolare di una Donna Straordinaria nel Quattrocentro

Despite the wealth of research conducted on the Italian Renaissance, the field of woman writers has been largely overlooked under the assumption that women in the Renaissance simply produced very little written work, and even then very little written work of any interest to modern scholars.  Only in the last ten to twenty years have a limited number of scholars begun to explore the topic, finding quickly that women did in fact produce a large quantity of work on a variety of topics that offer great insight into the intellectual and social culture of the Italian Renaissance.  This study examines a little-known collection of female biographies from 1497 by a male author, one of the earliest examples of this type of work in the Renaissance and extremely unique in its inclusion of a woodcut portrait of each of the 186 women it discusses.  An analysis of this author’s perspective on one female humanist writer, Isotta Nogarola, is made possible through the transcription and translation of the book’s original Latin text, of which no previous transcriptions or translations currently exist.  This analysis demonstrates the legitimacy of these women in their own time through their acknowledgement by their male counterparts, and the importance of their writings as evidenced by this authors use of female biographies for his own intellectual gain.  The unprecedented number of biographies included in this work, many with a perspective unique to its author (as demonstrated in this analysis of Isotta Nogarola’s biography), also serve to validate the existence of note-worthy, female-produced writings in the Italian Renaissance.  This project marks the beginning of an exploration of a previously overlooked and greatly important Renaissance text that will contribute to future research in the field of Italian woman writers.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Scarlett Mai (Comparative History of Ideas)
Dr. Maria Elena Garcia
Mediating the Tension Between Individual and Cultural Rights

Does human rights law replicate colonial law in its displacement and denigration of different cultural conceptions of justice? This essay argues that, although some transnational actors replicate colonial discourse when they prematurely criticize culture, indigenous women are not passively yielding to outside impositions of human rights. Rather, they are appropriating human rights and adopting tactics that resist, rather than reinscribe, national and transnational power structures. In defending traditional forms of village-based reconciliation against the criticism of the CEDAW Committee, Fijian women are reconceptualizing what it means to bring justice to victims of gender violence. Village-based reconciliation is an attractive addition to formal legal proceedings because it is flexible enough to incorporate counseling and compensation for victims. Fijian women navigate the tension between women’s rights and cultural rights by renegotiate gender relationships within their culture while affirming their right to define and shape village-based reconciliation.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Honorable Mention

Julia Abelev
Political Science
Perceptual Realism and the Winter War of 1939
Dr. Elizabeth Kier

Laura Harrington

Comparative History of Ideas
Freetown Girls: Post-Conflict Gender Identity in Sierra Leone
Christina Wygant and Dr. Clarke Speed

Maggi Nafie Little

European Studies
How the UN Failed Kosova and the Role of the EU
Professor Carol Thomas

Mikhail Smirnov
Economics
Explaining the East Asian "Miracle": Differentiating between Export Promotion and Retail Demand
Professor Gary Hamilton

Gus Andreasen, Alison McKay, Kristin Olson, Stephen Printz, Andrew Schwartz, Marta Schwendeman, Naama Sheffer, Jamie Stroble, and Julia Troutt
Canadian Studies
Towards Arctic Resolution: Issues of Sovereignty and Governance in the Circumpolar North
Nadine Fabbi and Professor Vincent Gallucci

2008 Winners

Senior Thesis Division, Friends of the Libraries Award

Senior Thesis Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

Senior Non-Thesis Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

 

Non-senior Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

Honorable Mention

Lorna Barron
Anthropology
The "Voluntourism" Phenomenon: Trend Relations and the Critique of Colonialism
Professor Miriam Kahn

Gelsey C. Hughes
International Studies
Switzerland and Immigration: An Integration Issue
Professor Jason Scheiderman

Calla M. Hummel
International Studies
Tenhos Meus Ideas e Nao Posso Ficar Calada: Riot Grrrl in Brazilian Civil Society
Professor Deborah Porter

Vi Lhuat Nhan
International Studies
Press Openness in China: A Comparative Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Labor Disputes
Professor Susan H. Whiting

Vitaliy O. Pradun
Political Science
From Bottle Rockets to Lightning Bolts: Chinas Missile-Centric Strategy and the Declining US Prospects in a Regional War
Professors Saadia Pekkanen and David Bachman

Victoria Liubenova Stephanova
Atmospheric Sciences
Losing the Rainforest: The Economics and Ecology of Cattle in the Brazilian Amazon
Professor David Battisti

Kendra Lesley Wendel
Scandinavian Studies
Where there's a Will there's a Way: High vs. Low Governance and Public Transportation in Three Cities
Professor Christine Ingebritsen

Sharae Marie Wheeler
History
"A Sort of Normal Life:" Japanese American Marriage Practices within the Context of the World War II Incarceration Period
Professor Robert C. Stacey

2007 Winners

Senior Division, Friends of the Libraries Award

Rachel Lynne Anderson (Comparative Religion)
Faculty Advisor: Professor Martin Jaffee

The Crucified Woman:  A Paradox of Prurience and Piety
This project examines an oddly paradoxical motif that arose within Western Christian iconography of the Middle Ages - the Crucified Woman. In Medieval artworks, females were depicted upon the cross in an erotically suggestive manner; and yet, these were the bodies of saints, virgins whose martyrdoms were the result of their very refusal to indulge male sexual desire. This amalgam yielded an extraordinarily freighted image that encompassed both Christ’s Passion and sexual passion. My essay seeks to explicate the functioning of this juxtaposition by situating the images within their social, literary, ritualistic, and hagiographic context. What emerges is a multifaceted picture of the rhetoric of crucifixion, devotionalist ideas of piety and pain, and the power of a saint’s body to concurrently induce lust and shame. The essay concludes with a survey of how the tradition of the Crucified Woman has been carried on in fin de siècle and contemporary artworks.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Naraelle Barrows (Comparative History of Ideas)
Professor John E. Toews

Reinventing Traditionalism:  The Influence of Critical Reconstruction on the Shape of Berlin's Friedrichstadt

This paper follows the history of the architectural city planning concept called “Critical Reconstruction” and its application in the city of Berlin from the late 1970s until today, using a district of Berlin called the Friedrichstadt as a case study. A brief overview of historical Berlin city planning and architectural styles is given, along with a short summary of post-World War II approaches to construction. The development of the concept of Critical Reconstruction during the late 1960s by Berlin architect Josef Paul Kleihues is examined, especially as it relates to the backlash against Modernist architectural theories. This is followed by an account of Critical Reconstruction’s applications in West Berlin during the 1980s through the Internationale Bauaustellung (International Building Exhibition). City planning trends in East Berlin during the 1980s, which mirrored those in the West, are also explored, as are challenges faced by the post-reunification city planning officials. Finally, the political and historical significance of Critical Reconstruction’s most recent incarnation as the guiding planning principle for Berlin’s new building and restoration projects is addressed, using examples from the case study area.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Emma Grunberg (History and International Studies)
Professor Shuan Lopez

Rationality of Inaccurate Science:  Britain, Cholera and the Pursuit of Progress in 1883

During the 1883 cholera epidemic in Egypt, then a British protectorate, British officials tried to prove that the epidemic had originated in Egypt and had not been brought there on a British ship through the Suez Canal. Why would the British, the dominant power in the region, attempt to scientifically prove this “local-origin” theory even as bacteriologists were about to find the clinching evidence that would disprove it? Through an analysis of British reports, correspondence and press articles from 1883, I argue that the British wanted to protect their image as a modern, civilized power – an image that required them to use the language of science and rationality even while approaching the problem of cholera from a political and economic perspective. The epidemic, a little-studied episode of colonial history, provides a window into the relationship between frenzied imperial competition and the concurrent progress of medical science.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Senior Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

Renata Frietas Lemos (International Studies)
Professor Wolfram Latsch


Tapping into Culture: Examining a Post-conflict Microfinance Approach in Huambo, Angola

Globally, post-conflict microfinance has been used to regenerate war-torn economies, reduce dependence on relief, and support development programs. However, facilitating conditions for its success include the pre-existence of a minimal stock of social capital in the society. This study challenges this idea by examining the case of Development Workshop’s microfinance program with the Ovimbundu population in Huambo, Angola. The results suggest that DW’s microfinance program was successful because it inherently approached the post-conflict situation from a cultural perspective. That is, implicit in its deployment of microfinance projects is a consideration of the economic and social systems of reference in which the Ovimbundu were functioning. My case study of DW’s program and the rebuilding of the Ovimbundu society contributes to the lack of literature in this field by providing a different analysis to post-conflict microfinance and gaining a better understanding of its entrench into the cultural aspects of society.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Brooke C. McKean (International Studies)
Professor Deborah Porter

Invisible Lives:  Stories of Innovation and Transition

My thesis seeks to understand why the slum population in Mumbai continues to grow during India’s era of liberalization. Traditional economic theory argues that these policies of political and economic openness should increase the well-being of the poorest groups. However, in Mumbai, the richest city in India, over half the population lives in slums. I argue that a dialectical relationship between the state and slum-dwellers allows this contradictory system to persist. To define and understand this relationship, I utilize two concepts. First, I propose the government and the affluent elite construct slum-dwellers as “liminal citizens,” or a transitional group. Second, I argue in reaction, slum-dwellers redefine their identities and incorporate strategies of survival, constructing a “shadow hegemony” that defies the state.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Lydia Wright (International Studies)
Professor Cabeiri deBergh Robinson

Beyond the Mosque Walls:  Legal Constructions 'Apostasy' and 'Blasphemy' in Egypt's Public Sphere

This thesis examines the criminalization of apostasy in Egypt, focusing specifically on the public debates that took place after the murder of secularist Farag Fouda in 1992. Although Egypt boasts an independent press and protection of free speech, countless authors and political figures have come under fire – both literally and figuratively – in the 1990s for actions deemed detrimental to the public good. The following analysis challenges the argument that public debate is non-existent in the Muslim world. After careful translation of Arabic-language newspaper articles and interviews with Egyptian religious figures, artists, teachers, journalists and lay persons, I posit the apostasy debate was not simply existent in Egypt; it was also vociferous, passionate, and ubiquitous. Significantly, this debate was not between religious scholars or jurists. Rather, it flourished in the public sphere via widespread news publications, allowing lay Egyptians into a debate previously held behind the mosque walls.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Non-senior Division, Kenneth S. Allen Award

Ambrogino Giusti (History)
Professor Robert Stacey

The Green Press:  Mass Media and the U.S. Environmental Movement 1945-1975

This paper enriches our understanding of the history of U.S. environmentalism by examining the media’s coverage of urban air pollution in the post-war period. Specifically, an analysis of media content from this period helps explain why modern environmentalism arose in the 1960s as a popular movement for strong regulations at the local, state, and national level. By prodding readers to take action on air pollution control in their cities, newspapers increased the likelihood that city residents would take a greater interest in environmental issues in general. By framing the issue of air pollution as a ubiquitous and transboundary problem, newspapers helped raise support among city residents for action at multiple levels of government. Finally, by framing the issue of air pollution as an immense and worsening public health crisis in the 1960s, newspapers helped galvanize support for strong regulations among the citizenry, particularly in the 1960s.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Jing-Lan Lee (International Studies)
Professor David Bachman

The H5N1 Virus:  Global Health Implications and a Need for Chinese Preparedness

This paper seeks to analyze the primacy of China’s role in global health and disease control through an assessment of the government’s response capability regarding the spread of the H5N1 virus, also known as bird or avian flu. Tracing the origins of the disease back to Guangdong Province and the effects that emerging mutant strains of the virus have on surrounding East and Southeast Asian populations through poultry exports highlights the crucial role China will play in providing a transparent and efficient response to contain and combat a potential pandemic outbreak. Criticized for its irresponsible drug administration and opacity in handling SARS in the past, Chinese officials openly recognize the necessity of greater transparency. Yet, a lack of available vaccines, distribution chains and specific containment strategies also speak to measures that China must take act as a responsible status quo power and an emerging stakeholder in the international community.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Lilia Peng (International Studies)
Professor David Bachman

British Withdrawal from Greece:  Protecting Imperial Power

This paper examines why the British withdrew support from Greece during the Greco-Turkish War of 1919-1922, despite significant British economic, political, and military gains from a Greek victory. Since Greece was under strong British influence, her land concessions from the Treaty of Sèvres would provide Britain with access to crucial ports, trade centers, and strategic military bases. The British withdrawal three years into the war resulted in a Greek defeat and Turkish victory, with Britain losing her potential gains from a Greek victory and enforcement of the treaty. Yet, despite the considerable losses Britain was forced to accept by withdrawing, she did so to protect her imperial power, which was threatened after Russia, France, and Italy aligned with Turkey, tipping the imperial balance of power unfavorably against Britain. Failure to withdraw could have resulted in even greater losses through a revision of the Treaty of Sèvres that ignored British interests.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Sharae Wheeler (History)
Professor Susan Glenn

Defunis vs. Odegaard:  Another Kind of "Jewish Problem"

This paper examines why the British withdrew support from Greece during the Greco-Turkish War of 1919-1922, despite significant British economic, political, and military gains from a Greek victory. Since Greece was under strong British influence, her land concessions from the Treaty of Sèvres would provide Britain with access to crucial ports, trade centers, and strategic military bases. The British withdrawal three years into the war resulted in a Greek defeat and Turkish victory, with Britain losing her potential gains from a Greek victory and enforcement of the treaty. Yet, despite the considerable losses Britain was forced to accept by withdrawing, she did so to protect her imperial power, which was threatened after Russia, France, and Italy aligned with Turkey, tipping the imperial balance of power unfavorably against Britain. Failure to withdraw could have resulted in even greater losses through a revision of the Treaty of Sèvres that ignored British interests.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Honorable Mention

Dinara Abilova
Geography
Controversey around Genetically Modified Food in Zambia
Professor Craig Jeffrey (Geography | International Studies)

Matan Barnea
Geography
A Holy City? The Gay Pride Rally of 2006 and Varying Conceptions of the Meaning of Jerusalem
Professor Michael Brown (Geography)

Alventina Alexandrovna Gall
International Studies
The Role of the State in the Integration of Traditional and Conventional Medicine in Africa: A Case Study of South Africa, Tanzania and Gambia
Professor Gad Barzilai (International Studies)

Christina Kipelidis
UW Tacoma Core
Stem Cell Research: Ethics versus the Progression of Science
Professors Donal Chinn (Institute of Technology) and
Amos Nascimento (Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences)

Alex Kyllo
International Studies
Sichuan Peppercorn: The Roles of a Spice in the Chaning Political Economy of China's Sichuan Province
Professor Stevan Harrell (Anthropology)

Marshall Kramer
International Studies
State of Inpurity: The Violentt Experience of the Nation in Myanmar
Professor Cabeiri deBergh Robinson (International Studies)

John Lee Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
The Effect of Anxiety Disorder Comorbidity on Treatment Resistant Bipolar Disorders
Professor David L. Dunner (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)

Lisa Mahlum History
The Similarities of Differences: A Comparative Analysis of the New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston and the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin
Professor Robert C. Stacey (History)

Lukas Svec Mathematics
Applying Voronoi Diagrams to the Redistricting Problem
Professor James A. Morrow (Mathematics)

Rose Thorton
Urban Design & Planning
The Price of Environmental Restoration: When Taxes Replaced Tugs on the Thea Foss Waterway
Instructor Cynthia Updegrave (Biology)

2006 Winners

Senior Division

Robert Branom (History)
Faculty Advisor: Professor John Findlay

Against the 'Hun': Anti-Germanism at the Seattle Public Schools and the University of Washington, 1917-1918
Episodes of intensified discrimination against specific ethnic groups have occurred throughout American history, particularly at the onset of wars. The internment of Japanese-Americans in “relocation centers” at Manzanar, Minidoka, and Heart Mountain, during World War II, stands as one of the most widely known and unfortunate moments of "nativist" discrimination. More recently, self-described patriots attacked American Muslims following 9-11. Intensive periods of mass immigration have also stirred hatred among sectors of the Anglo-Saxon majority, against Germans, Irish, and other Catholics following the 1848 European exodus, and against Slavs, Jews, Italians, and Asians entering the US in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Lauren Bruce (History)
Professor Uta Poiger

Girls Just Want To Have Fun: Evaluations of the Moga During the Interwar Years

The Concise Oxford English Dictionary defines ‘modern’ as "denoting a recent style in art, architecture, etc. marked by a departure from traditional styles and values". In her paper for her History 494 E seminar entitled "Girls just want to have fun: American and Japanese Evaluations of the Japanese Moga During the Interwar Years”, Ms. Bruce examines one example of the conflict between the modern world and traditional culture which occurred in Japan during the years between the World Wars. The term "Moga" or ‘modan garu” was applied to young women who challenged the traditional modes of behavior and dress and adopted more Western attitudes. Sometimes called ‘Japanese flappers’ these young women were criticized by both Japanese and American writers as promiscuous and threatening to cultural values.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Carolyn Claridge (International Studies)
Professor Wolfram Latsch

La Lucha por el Agua, la Lucha por la Vida: The Political Economy of Water Privatization in Cochabamba, Bolivia

It is significant that Carolyn Claridge's senior honors thesis frames its title with a Spanish language expression; it is an indication of the diversity of viewpoints that she brings to bare on the intransigent questions of water rights in Bolivia. In her own words "This thesis is an investigation into the attempted privatization of the city of Cochabamba's water supply and the subsequent social uprising." The paper investigates why privatization was "incompatible with the socio-cultural and economic dynamics of Cochabamba;" it looks beyond easy solutions to be found in the literatures of the globalizing economy to local conditions and issues of governance. In recognizing this project, the jurors endorsed the view of Carolyn's advisor, Prof Wolfram Latsch, that she has "synthesized a large number of different information sources in different languages and subjects."

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Anne Kim (International Studies)
Professor Mary Callahan

Drug Wars: South Africa’s Nevirapine Policy

Bringing questions she had from personally meeting South Africans while studying abroad back to Seattle, Anne Kim has written a lucid and persuasive essay about a topic of extreme importance. Her masterful essay explores the complex question of the HIV-AIDS epidemic, and addresses this vital issue through the history of state-society relations in post-Apartheid South Africa.

Why, Kim asks, would the post-Apartheid South African government stand in the way of treatments that prevent the transmission of the virus from mothers to children? Kim's daring essay eschews simple answers in the face of the complex life and death situation that entire populations are facing. Gathering together documentation from diverse sources, Kim provides a compelling and troubling picture of the ideological legacies of racism--and perhaps more disturbingly, the ideological legacies of struggles against racism--as well as the very material consequences such a history has had upon contemporary state policies on an imperative public health concern.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Julie McElroy-Brown (UW Tacoma|Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences)
Professor Michael Kucher

Shipbreaking at Alang, India

Julie McElroy-Brown’s winning essay, "Shipbreaking at Alang, India" was a fascinating study on the afterlife of ships. The paper explored how ships, when they reach the end of their lives, are broken, or disassembled, by workers in Alang, India who do the work mostly by hand. This dangerous work exposes them and their environment to dangerous chemicals, and Ms. McElroy-Brown carefully analyzed the complicated political and economic issues that help to move the practice of shipbreaking from the rich world to places like Alang, India and that keep the work there.

In doing so, Ms. McElroy-Brown immersed herself in a number of fields including: medicine, the marine environment, Indian government structures and international trade. The essay is beautifully written, and is the result of impressive and resourceful research. Ms. McElroy-Brown used a wide variety of sources for her essay, was critical in choosing which she would use and which she would reject, and when she hit road blocks showed ingenuity in solving the inevitable problems that arise in conducting research.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Non-senior Award Recipients

Naraelle Barrows, Arin Delaney, Edith Fikes & Ingrid G. Haftel (Comparative History of Ideas)
Teaching Assistant: Giorgia Aiello

Aurora Avenue: Highway Culture in Transition

This Winter I had the good fortune to connect with Giorgia Aiello and facilitate a library instruction session in her CHID270 class. After my two hour session with her class, I was raving about her students for days! They were extremely intelligent, perceptive, and engaged. But what impressed me most, were the excellent questions they asked. Naraelle Barrows, Arin Delaney, Edith Fikes, and Ingrid Haftel were four of the students in that class and the product of their work, titled "Aurora Avenue: Highway Culture in Transition", is delight to read.

These four students used a visual analysis of its highway signage to situate this Seattle roadway in various contexts including Seattle history, American highway culture, and the socio-economic factors affecting Aurora Avenue's growth and decline.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Sarah Cunningham (International Studies)
Professor Barbara Henry

Remembering Laughter and Tears in a Drawer: Music as a Response to Soviet Repression

Sarah Cunningham has strong passions for research and writing and for Russian history and culture. On the project that brought her to us today, she explored a fascinating topic:  the relations between politics and art, in this case music and the totalitarian politics of the Soviet Union. She focuses on one of the giants of twentieth century music, Dimitri Shostakovich, and one of the monsters of twentieth century politics, Josef Stalin. She bases her essay on a strong research base, to which she applied a critical methodology, and she presents her findings in a mature writing style.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Janice Phaik Lin Goh (International Studies)
Professor Mary Callahan

Chairman Mao: Great Leader, Great Teacher, Great Supreme Commander, Great Helmsman and the Great Leap Forward

In her paper, Chairman Mao:  Great Leader, Great Teacher, Great Supreme Commander, Great Helmsman and the Great Leap Forward, Junior Janice Phaik Lin Goh explores how a legacy and continuing policy of political suppression in China helped to secure Chairman Mao’s reign from 1954-1959 amid devastating economic and social policy, while reifying his status as a legendary hero in present-day China.

Her professor, Mary Callahan explained that Janice "was a regular at the reference desk in the East Asia Library and frequently came to me almost out of breath with excitement about the primary sources she was digging up. Using memoirs and Communist Party documents, she argues that Mao was particularly adept at oppressing dissent . . . Her use of primary sources . . . brings new kinds of voices to bear on debates about Mao in Chinese history."

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


 

Samuel Hong, Bradley King, Cuong Nguyen, Robert Schmuck, Aaron Smith, Mark Wilber & Candice Joy Worden (Geography)
Professor Mathew Sparke

How the XBOX went 360: An Overview of XboxÂ’s International Markets and Transnational Production

This group of seven students admirably traversed the vast resources of a variety of libraries on campus to produce two excellent projects, a written report and a DVD film. Their essays clearly reflected their growth through the research process. For example, one essay describes the process of going from a frustrating Google search to seeking help from colleagues and librarians, learning about what they called "priceless tools."

The group’s paper provides a history of Microsoft as a video game developer by examining the integrated, globalized plan of production, marketing and design of Xbox 360 in the process of becoming a transnational commodity. The paper reveals attributes of the technology involved in the development of Xbox 360 as part of its focus.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

Honorable Mention

Senior Recipients

Gina Guyer
School of International Studies
National Images
Professor Laada Bilaniuk (Anthropology)

Taylor Haydu
History
The Catholic Church and the Hungarian Holocaust
Professor James Felak (History)

James Hong
Psychology
Sex Differences in Autonomic Correlates of Conduct Disorder in Middle Childhood
Professor Theodore P. Beauchaine (Psychology)

Megan E. Kalmoe
English
Social Networking Websites: Redefining Self, Community and Reality
Professor Alys Eve Weinbaum (English)

Non-senior Recipients

Roselle Kingsbury
Freshman
International Studies
¿Patria y Libertad para Quién? The Status of Gay Rights in Cuba
Professor Mary Callahan (International Studies)

Megan Kinsella
Junior
International Studies
Refugees and Immigrants from the former Yugoslavia
Professor Kathie Friedman (International Studies)

Monty Reed
Junior
Biology
Biosynthetic Muscle for Powered Control of Robotic Suit: Rehabilitation Medicine Applications
Professor Karen Petersen (Biology)

Harkirat Sohi
Junior
Music
A Journey through Indian Film Music
Professor Ramesh Gangolli (Mathematics | Music))

Nathan Vass
Sophomore
Geography
Geography: A Three Part Paper
Professor Michael Brown (Earth and Space Sciences) & Graduate Student Courtney Donovan (Geography)

2005 Winners

$1000 Award Recipients

Ryan Bressler, Braxton Osting, and Christina Polwarth (Mathematics)
Faculty Advisor: Professor Professor Jim Morrow

Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River Valley
Ryan Bressler, Braxton Osting, and Christine Polwarth entered the Mathematical Contest in Modeling, an international competition. They were given four days to develop a model of a physical situation unknown to them in advance, and to solve it with appropriate parameters.

They worked together as a team, parceling out specific tasks. In the end they had to deduce from the literature the governing laws for flow out of a dam breach and then solve ordinary differential equations. They used 50-year old books (with engineering empiricism before computers) and new books (2002, more advanced because computers are more advanced) and journals. Then they modeled a catastrophic break in the dam and solved hyperbolic partial differential equations, using the topographical maps to determine the needed parameters.

We can report that the capitol building in Columbia, South Carolina was saved from this catastrophic flood. We are proud to add our endorsement to their first prize in the international contest, against over 800 other entries.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


Cameron Geasey (International Studies)
Professor Stephen Hanson

Chained to the Past:  The Roots of Russia's Population Decline

Is Russia finished, as the covers of the Atlantic Monthly and New Yorker have proclaimed in recent years? Is its population doomed to steadily evaporate amid pandemics of STDs, alcoholism, and suicide in a natural environment that has been polluted beyond repair and within a decaying built environment inherited from Soviet times? Cameron Geasey mined the UW Libraries' print, digital, and microfilm resources to produce a paper suggesting that these dire trends can be reversed.

Cameron’s advisor, Professor Stephen Hanson, suggests that "we are dealing here with a scholar far more sophisticated than the typical undergraduate," one with "strong Russian language skills, an ability to tackle complex theoretical topics, and excellent writing ability."

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


Jesse Jahnke (International Studies)
Professor Mary Callahan

The "Development Paradox":  The Gap Between Rhetoric & Reality

Service on this "jury" offers an opportunity to read well researched and well written essays on big topics, and Jesse Janke’s study is one of the best. Based upon a critical reading of a rich collection of published sources, it explores a problem of large importance: the failure of agricultural development projects.

"The world community," Janke writes, "has yet to raise the standards of living for rural peasants in sub-Saharan Africa." She boldly analyzes the projects, concluding that "the ‘development’ regime of the 70s and 80s set itself up to fail by disregarding or over-simplifying both the power frameworks in the communities… and the complex ecosystems that make large-scale agriculture more difficult in Africa." Yet she does not stop there. Instead, she also calls attention to alternative approaches, more holistic ones, and does not leave us feeling that nothing can be done to improve the lives of impoverished rural people south of the Sahara.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


Simeon Man (History)
Professor Chandan Reddy

Internationalizing the "Negro" and "Oriental":  Rethinking Race in the Age of Empire

Simeon Man’s essay takes on the challenging assignment of seeking the roots of activist African-American internationalism in the years prior to which it has been located by recent scholarship, namely in the decade immediately following World War I.

The essay’s ambitious research strategy makes extraordinarily effective use of Suzzallo Library’s superb printed and microfilm resources; it crafts its materials into a work of mature scholarship, written with clarity, grace, and exceptional intellectual power.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


Eric Mvukiyehe (Political Science)
Professor Jonathan Mercer

Transnational and Cross-Border Relations:  State Failure and the International Spread of Ethnic Conflict in Zaire in 1996

Eric's sophisticated analysis of the international spread of ethnic conflict challenges existing political theories based on rational choice and cost-benefit analysis. His thesis, "Transnational and Cross-border Relations: State Failure and the International Spread of Ethnic Conflict in Zaire in 1996" examines, in particular, the case of Zaire during the summer of 1996, within the framework of two alternative theories that link the cross-border displacement of refugees and the existence of co-ethnics across borders to the international spread of conflict. He finds that these theories must be coupled with an examination of the host state conditions and the strength of ethnic affinity in order to predict the international escalation of the conflict.

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.


Kayanna Warren (International Studies)
Professor Stevan Harrell

To Market:  China's Changing Market Participation in Remote Rural Areas

Kayanna Warren's senior honors thesis in International Studies describes a part of the booming Chinese economy not usually examined. Kayanna, who has a double major in Biology and International Studies, spent a year in China collecting the data that informs her thesis.

In his supporting letter, her advisor, Professor of Anthropology Stevan Harrell, notes the scholarly disciplines whose literature Kayanna explored, including economic development, modern Chinese history, Chinese economic history, agricultural economics, agroecology, and ethnicity and ethnic relations. Impressively, she used statistical and narrative sources in Chinese as well as English. Research tenacity, depth and breadth characterize Kayanna's efforts in the field and in the library. As Professor Harrell writes, her thesis "is a work that illustrates the usefulness of library collections even when they are not the exclusive source of data or information for a project."

©Reproduction of this award project in part or in whole without permission of the author is expressly prohibited.

2004 Winners

$1000 Award Recipients

Nicolaas Barr (Senior)
Faculty Advisor: Professor John E. Toews

Man must be himself: Freud's Masculine Identity of Autonomy, 1872-1901


Jennifer B. Glass (Sophomore)
Professors David C. Streatfield & Paul Quay

Mid-Winter 1894


Joanne Ho (Senior)
Professors Kathie Friedman & Stevan Harrell

Pockets of Poverty in a Fast-growing Economy: Quantifying Market Shares in Rural Southwest China


John R. Mitchell, IV (Senior)
Professor Emeritus Fred J. Levy

To Creat a New and Different Life: The Development of an Upper-Class Suburb in Bellevue (WA), 1940-1960


Rachel Shields (Senior)
Professor Jonathan Mercer

Recurrence of Things Past: The Strange Like-ness of Beowulf and the Old Man and the Sea


Carrie E. Spradlin (Senior)
Professor Kenneth J. Raedeke

Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep in Curecanti National Recreation Area, Colorado: Home Range Estimation and Potential for Population Restoration